Friday, November 30, 2012

Mac-Security Blog Status Report 2012-11

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Apologies to regular readers of this blog. I've been extremely distracted by a multitude of personal stuff that has a higher priority. Therefore, I'm extremely behind keeping up with current Mac computer security.

I also have to admit to burnout from having to deal with the current state of computer security in general. The current state of overall computer security is: ABYSMAL.

Then add to that a consistent, dare I say totalitarian inspired, interest by our Corporate Oligarchy and the governments they puppet, as well as other lunatic organizations (such as the Communist party in China) to SURVEIL our every move on the Internet to our detriment and their deceitful gain. Not good. I'm no fan of FUD or paranoia. So when this rubbish thinking becomes justified, it's annoying.

When I started this blog back in 2007, the entire point was to create the first, one simple place to keep up with Mac computer security. I was hoping it would only be the first and there would be other, far more professional locations where all of us could keep up with Mac security. I've run into one other person with the same goal as myself. Just one! That is Thomas Reed of "Thomas' Tech Corner".

Thomas and I are part of a great group of writers, developers and tech fanatics who study, work with and chat about Mac computer security. Our group was started by ClamXav mastermind and altruistic developer Mark Allan. As a gestalt, we attempt to keep track of exactly what is going on with Mac security over time. We also work HARD to keep the ClamAV malware definitions up-to-date with all the Mac malware definitions, with only partial success.

I'm going to be collaborating with Thomas to create ongoing lists of active malware for Mac to share here and at Thomas's site.

But both of us are finding the task of creating a complete list to be EXTREMELY daunting. The reason why is complex. But the worse reason is specifically because ALL of the commercial anti-malware development companies treat malware as if it was their personal property, go get your own, we're not sharing. Therefore, it is IMPOSSIBLE to know all the current Mac malware. I find that to be idiotic, unprofessional and shocking. No surprise around here.

Here's a fun example:
I have in my possession one piece of malware that NO ONE has made public. It is not universally identified among the Mac anti-malware vendors. It is a root kit. Root kits are potentially the most dangerous form of malware for computers because they actively hide from any form of malware detection. Our group is still trying to make heads or tails about what's going on with this specific malware. I can tell you that it is detected by at least Intego's Virus Barrier X6 as 'Rubilyn.A' but is also known as 'Xorsysct!.A'. Why isn't this root kit public knowledge? Beats me! Intego has published nothing about it. I tested the malware in VBX6 and was happy to find it detected. But they have nothing to share in public about it? Why? I am hoping that has changed by the time you read this blog entry.

This is only one example of many of what I am calling the 'SECRET MALWARE' bull shit going on within the anti-malware industry.

Let's go mental: Is this part of our well-known governmental attempt to circumvent US Constitutional rights to privacy via undetectable root kit malware? How the hell would I know? But that's what this industrial secrecy stinks of in my humble uninformed opinion. At the very least, it's more of the same old UNprofessional behavior I've found consistent within the anti-malware business.

Therefore, I'm getting burned out.

As a result, my future posts may not be as thorough, as frequent, or effective as in the past. I can't pretend to be fulfilling the manifesto for my blog.

You've probably heard all this sort of burn out blether-fest in the past from other information sources. Just know that I constantly have Mac security going on around my head because I enjoy the subject. I am selectively deciding what small contributions I can make via this blog to Mac user's understanding of Mac security. I'm sticking around, but not as effectively as I would prefer.

Therefore, I'm going to be putting together a list of my favorite Mac security information sources, such as Thomas's website, for your benefit. They're where I first go to learn what's going on. Hopefully, they will help fill in your need for knowledge of Mac security while I decrease down my involvement. Coming up next!

Thank you for your interest.

:-Derek Currie

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